Eating Boiled Eggs Has a Serious Side Effect

A hard-boiled egg is a fantastic source of protein that can help you feel satisfied, but the new “boiled egg diet” goes too far. That’s according to two dietitians, as a new stringent weight-loss craze is gaining traction on social media. What is the boiled egg diet, and what does it entail? You should be aware of the following information.

According to Women’s Health, the boiled egg diet is causing a lot of talk on the internet. This isn’t the diet you think it is (fortunately). It’s made out of boiled eggs, but that’s not all. The boiled egg diet also includes a list of lean proteins (fish, pork, skinless poultry), non-starchy vegetables (think leafy greens, broccoli, bell peppers, asparagus, and carrots), a small number of fruits (berries, lemons, grapefruit, and watermelon), and low fats, according to the WH (butter, mayonnaise, and coconut oil)

Boiling eggs are served up to three times per day.

According to registered dietitian and nutritionist Erin Palinski-Wade, the boiled egg component of the diet comes in when a person eats two eggs with fruit for the morning, then veggies with eggs or another lean protein for lunch and dinner.

 

It’s low-carb and low-calorie, to be sure.

You will lose weight if you eliminate all carbohydrates from your diet—but not in a healthy way. The problem with the boiled egg diet, according to Palinski-Wade, is that it doesn’t deliver all of the nutrients your body requires.

WH also quotes Keri Gans, a certified dietitian, and nutritionist, who lists the foods that aren’t allowed on the boiled egg diet: “The diet advises against eating any processed foods, including potatoes, corn, peas, and legumes. Bananas, pineapple, mango, dried fruits, and sweetened beverages are among the fruits to stay away from.”

A new study emphasizes the importance of consuming whole grains for cardiovascular health and how whole grains can even help you lose weight, which is just one example of why this isn’t good for your health.

The boiled egg diet has the potential to go bad very quickly.

A couple of hard-boiled eggs now and again is fine, but multiples every day? Palinski-Wade believes that successful dieting would be unsustainable for most people. It’s also worth noting that, while eggs provide a lot of health benefits, they’re also high in cholesterol and saturated fat.

 

All pictures support by: Pexels.com

No Responses

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *